Hawa, An Inspired Entrepreneur

DARFUR – Near East Foundation beneficiaries are known to be industrious and inspired when starting their enterprises. In Sudan, the beneficiaries of NEF and the United States Agency for International Development’s Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance’s Resources, Livelihoods, and Security project are no different. Walking through the markets of Abata, a small area southwest of the Central Darfur State capital of Zalingei, you will find Hawa Zakariya Mohamed, an NEF beneficiary and cloth seller. Hawa, 36, has a recently widowed niece with two children who fell on hard economic times.

“I benefited so much from NEF’s business training workshops,” Hawa says, “and I still remember every bit of it, so I began to teach my niece. Because I have had such good fortune from my business, I gave her money to start her own business.”

Hawa’s niece, 28, did just that. Using the tools and training Hawa taught her from NEF’s workshops, her niece began to sell traditional Sudanese foods in the same marketplace.

“She benefited from my advice and would always apply what she learned,” Hawa says. “My niece has now surpassed the hardship of life she had been in and she is moving forward. This has made me so content and satisfied.”

 

 


 

This story is made possible by the generous support of the American people through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The contents are the responsibility of the Near East Foundation, and do not necessarily reflect the views of USAID or the United States government.

Musa Mohamed’s Business Starts Cooking

Musa Adam Mohamed

DARFUR – Musa Adam Mohamed sits in his small business, selling kitchen utensils. He lives in the Abata area of Sudan, 35 kilometers west of Zalingei, the capital of Central Darfur State. Musa, 43, is a beneficiary of the Near East Foundation’s and the United States Agency for International Development’s Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance’s Resources, Livelihoods, and Security program. He decided to start this business as part of the NEF project because he noticed a need in the local market.

“I have solved the women’s problems regarding the purchases of the kitchen utensils, which are so important to them,” Musa says. “I make it so easy for them by selling them these commodities in reasonable prices and in convenient installments, especially for those who can’t pay immediately.”

Musa’s business sense and willingness to deal with his customers are paying off. His small business is expanding to the point that he is considering approaching a bank for a loan.

“I am thinking of starting something new in the big markets in Zalingei,” he says. “Thank you, NEF, and all the best for you in your efforts … You’re doing a wonderful job.”

 

 


 

This story is made possible by the generous support of the American people through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The contents are the responsibility of the Near East Foundation, and do not necessarily reflect the views of USAID or the United States government.